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AUSTRALIAN CRIME PREVENTION COUNCIL

The Australian Crime Prevention Council is a voluntary association of individuals, departments and organisations representing a wide cross section of interests and disciplines, including branches of the criminal justice system, courts, police, corrections, prisons, mental health services, criminology and ethnic minority groups.

The Council's objectives include:

  • Assist and promote the prevention of crime;
  • Encourage participation by citizens in the prevention of crime;
  • Provide a forum for the free discussion of crime prevention issues;
  • Develop awareness and better understanding of the problems of crime and methods properly available to prevent it.

Primarily, the Council sees itself as a facilitator - bringing people and organisations with similar goals together.


NOTEWORTHY ARTICLES ON CRIME PREVENTION 

THE BENEFITS OF CRIME PREVENTION

Crime Prevention refers to the development and implementation of strategies and programs that aim to reduce crime before it occurs. It can reduce both short term and long term economic and social costs associated with crime and the criminal justice system. This means that crime prevention policies have the ability to achieve significant returns on investment for both society and the government in terms of benefits in justice, health, welfare and social capital. Sarah Ford highlights some key benefits achieved by the implementation of crime reduction strategies and programs.

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SOME CRIME PREVENTION PROGRAMS IN AUSTRALIA: A SNAPSHOT

Prepared by Sarah Ford for the Australian Crime Prevention Council, August 2014

INTRODUCTION

In recent decades crime prevention has been widely embraced internationally and across Australia (White & Perrone 2010). Moving beyond more traditional state-sanctioned forms of punishment and social control, crime prevention has the ability to be employed by a wide array of agencies and institutions (White & Perrone 2010). Evidence suggests that effective crime prevention programs need to be tailored to the specific circumstances or issues meaning that while there is some continuity in the application of crime prevention initiatives throughout Australia, there is also a diversity of programs (AIC 2011).

This paper will describe some key crime prevention programs and initiatives operating in Australia. This non-exhaustive list provides a snapshot of the nature and type of some contemporary crime prevention initiatives.

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Updated : 28th April 2016

 

Crime Statistics 2016

Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data


Compiled by Natalie Leung
Law Student, University of Sydney


Incidence of Crime

• While the volume and rate of individual crime types has fluctuated over the past few years, Australia’s crime rates have been decreasing (AIC, 2016: iii)

• There was an 11% decrease in victims of robbery between the years 2013 to 2014, with only 11, 698 victims (AIC, 2016: iii).

• Incidences of homicide decreased by 8% from 296 in 2011-2012 to 273 in 2012-2013. The rate of homicide is at a historical low at 1.2 per 100,000 people (AIC, 2016: iii).

• While most incidences of crime are decreasing, there was a 7% increase in recorded victims of sexual assault and 3% increase in recorded victims of assault (AIC, 2016: iv).

• You are more likely to be a victim of property crime rather than violent crime, but even rates of property crime decreased in 2012-2013 (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Most juveniles are convicted for theft, acts intending to cause injury and illicit drug offences (AIC, 2016: iv).

• Incidences of assault have fluctuated in the last decade, and peaked between 2007-2009. Since that time, the number of assaults have decreased by about 50,000 and in 2013 there were 119,235 assaults (AIC, 2016: 3).

• Robbery has been consistently declining during the decade between 2003-2013; incidences of robbery have almost halved from 19,709 to 11,698 (AIC, 2016: 3).


Offenders

• People aged between 15 to 19 years are the most likely to commit crimes. The importance of implementing more developmental crime prevention strategies has never been more relevant (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In no category did the rate of juvenile female offending exceed that of male offending (AIC, 2016: 45).

• 61% of adult male detainees charged with a violent offence as their most serious offence tested positive to some form of drug (AIC, 2016: 64).

• In the past 10 years, the imprisonment rate per 100,000 adults has increased by 10% from 156 per 100,000 in 2003 to 172 per 100,000 in 2013 (AIC, 2016: 73).

• In 2012-2013, 88% of sentences handed down in all courts were non-custodial (AIC, 2016: iv).

• In 2013, males account for 92% of prisoners, while females only accounted for 8%. This is a ratio of 13 males sentenced to every 1 female (AIC, 2016: 74).

• The indigenous imprisonment rate was 19 times higher than the non-indigenous rate in 2013. Indigenous prisoners comprise 27% of the total prisoner population (AIC, 2016: 75).

• The number of offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 increased by 2% (ABS, 2016).

• The number of youth offenders proceeded against by police in Australia during 2014-2015 decreased by 3% (ABS, 2016).

• In 2012-2013 $80,999 was spent per prisoner in Australia. The cost per person for having that same person in a community correction centre was only $8,384 (AIC, 2016: iv).


References

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, 4519.0 Recorded Crime – Offenders 2014-2015. [26 February 2016].
Accessed from:

ABS data


Australian Institute of Criminology 2016, Australian Crime: Facts and Figures 2014, prepared by the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra. [26 February 2016]
Accessed from:

AIC data